Social Sciences – UROP Summer Symposium 2021

Research Discipline(s): Social Sciences

Student Parents in Postsecondary Education: Relevant Policies and Practices

Student parents are a growing percentage of the college student population (Roy et al., 2018). For this group of nontraditional students, resources such as on-campus childcare, lactation spaces, and family housing are pertinent to balancing the demands of parenthood and school. However, recent studies (e.g., Kensinger & Minnick, 2018) have alluded to student parent invisibility in institutional policy and practice. In this study I examined inclusion of student parents in official university statements (i.e., policy), and access to information about, and availability of, student parent resources (i.e., practice). The study addresses three research questions: 1. Do public four-year universities & colleges include student parents in their non-discrimination &/or diversity statements? 2. For students who are parents, how easy is it for prospective and new university students to identify relevant resources? 3. Is the number of relevant resources related to inclusion of student parents in non-discrimination &/or diversity statements?

Assessing the Affective, Cognitive, and Behavioral Consequences of Men Recognizing Subtle Gender Bias Against Women in STEM

Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) frequently encounter gender bias (e.g., questioning of their STEM ability, assignment to secretarial roles). Given the subtle and ambiguous nature of contemporary sexism, people vary in their likelihood of recognizing subtly sexist interactions. Past research demonstrates that women are more sensitive to gender bias and more likely to perceive it. However, there remains a dearth of research related to men’s experiences in witnessing bias. In the present research, we ask: what are the (1) affective, (2) cognitive, and (3) behavioral consequences of perceiving subtle gender bias during group tasks?

S.T.E.A.M. Education

Introduced in 2016, STEAM is a new pedagogical approach that has been on the rise in many different countries. STEAM is the abbreviation for science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics. The integration of “Arts” within STEM has shown a significant increase in the motivation of children’s ability to be creative, problem solvers, and critical thinkers. Throughout the process of this literature review my goal was to answer the research question “How do STEAM, in contrast to STEM, approaches develop creativity, critical thinking, and agency among children?” To answer this question I reviewed 40 sources of qualitative and quantitative literature and of those, more than half provided strong support to the view that STEAM is very effective in developing 21st century skills such as creativity, critical thinking and problem solving. According to Hadinugrahaningsiha, “the term 21st-century skills is generally used to refer to certain core competencies such as collaboration, digital literacy, critical thinking, and problem-solving that advocates believe schools need to teach to help students thrive in globalisation world” (Hadinugrahaningsiha, 2017, p.1). STEAM effectiveness is measured by the behaviors of students after the curriculum is implemented. Studies indicate that even children at an early age demonstrated interest and academic growth (Awang, 2020). Considering this pedagogy is fairly new, there remains much ambiguity on the teaching styles, definition of “art”, and how the arts in STEAM will be implemented in lesson plans.

The Impact of Gain vs. Loss Frames on Decision Making: From Society to the Individual

The framing of mathematically equal outcomes as either a Gain or a Loss shifts decision-making in predictable ways. Prior research has focused on Gain versus Loss frameworks in the context of serious, societal-level decisions impacting whole communities. For example, in a study by Tversky and Kahneman (1981), participants were asked to choose between two social programs to address the outbreak of a serious disease. Program A presented a guaranteed outcome in terms of number of lives saved or lost, whereas Program B could only provide probability information and was thus “riskier.” When both programs were framed in terms of the number of lives saved (Gain condition), participants were significantly more likely to choose the guaranteed outcome. However, when both programs were framed in terms of number of lives lost (Loss condition), decision-making preference shifted toward the riskier program.

Impact of COVID-19 on Latinx Households

COVID-19 has impacted individuals in many different ways. In this project, we focus on how the pandemic has impacted the Latinx community. Oftentimes it is difficult for individuals in Latinx households to follow procedures such as social distancing or staying home as many come from low-income families and need to keep working, thus highly increasing the risk of spreading the virus. These living arrangements are associated with communalist cultural values such as familism. Within this project, the goal is to understand and explore how familism has impacted Latino’s individual beliefs.

Representations of ‘Sexlessness’ in Japan

Adrian Beyer Pronouns: He/Him/His UROP Fellowship: WAGSFP Research Mentor(s): Anna Wozny, PhD Candidate Research Mentor Institution/Department: College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, Department of Sociology Presentation Date: Wednesday, August 4th Session: Session 2 (4pm-4:50pm EDT) Breakout Room: Room 2 Presenter: 1 Event Link Abstract For privacy concerns this abstract cannot be published at this …

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Assessing the Affective, Cognitive, and Behavioral Consequences of Men Recognizing Subtle Gender Bias Against Women in STEM

Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) frequently encounter gender bias (e.g., questioning of their STEM ability, assignment to secretarial roles). Given the subtle and ambiguous nature of contemporary sexism, people vary in their likelihood of recognizing subtly sexist interactions. Past research demonstrates that women are more sensitive to gender bias and more likely to perceive it. However, there remains a dearth of research related to men’s experiences in witnessing bias. In the present research, we ask: what are the (1) affective, (2) cognitive, and (3) behavioral consequences of perceiving subtle gender bias during group tasks?

Binge Drinking Behaviors Among Sexual Minority Youth

Sexual minority youth (SMY), defined as youth who are not heterosexual or cis gendered, disproportionately engage in alcohol use behaviors, namely binge drinking, current alcohol use, and younger age of first consumption. Despite these disparities, research focused on alcohol use behaviors among SMY is limited. Because alcohol consumption is linked to sexual and other risk behaviors, there is a critical need to expand on this body of research to inform the development of interventions to decrease alcohol use behaviors among SMY. The purpose of this study was to explore whether SMY are more likely to report binge drinking than sexual majority groups in Michigan.

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