WEEK 10 – Detroit Community-Engaged Research Program

WEEK 10

As I reflect back on myself from 10 weeks ago, I am truly happy with my growth. Being a native of Detroit, I have always been very passionate about my city. That passion has grown immensely over the course of the this program. I have learned so much about the issues and current state of Detroit. Growing up with certain circumstances, I’ve always just accepted things for the way they were. I never really understood the issues and I didn’t try too hard to understand.

As I got older, I became concerned with the condition of Detroit and wanted to know how I could play my role. I wanted to make a difference, but I didn’t know how. I came to the conclusion that in order to make that difference I need to know the root of those issues. That is the main reason why I applied to the DCBRP with hopes to learn about the roots of Detroit. I can truly say this summer has been a mission completed. Working with Nortown CDC and other non profits from my neighborhood has changed my perspective on the issues and educated me. From learning about the water crisis to the how LIHTC Projects are conducted, I have gain so much more knowledge that I thought.

There have been moments in the program where I have been driven to tears, because I know the reality and true reason why so many issues have fell upon the city. The cause is one thing that I have been trying to run away from my entire life, one thing that I was hoping I would never have to deal with, racism. For the longest, I thought I was living in a post-racial society, a new era. But I was wrong, racism is alive and well, and is the root of why there are many issues in Detroit and not enough solutions.

Over the course of the past 10 weeks, I have become even more passionate to play my role in making Detroit a better city. I want to continue to work hard and educate myself to make the greatest difference that I possibly can. Detroit is my home, and I can’t stand to just let things be.

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